Creative reuse of your old slides

Are you planning to digitise your old slides? Are you going to dispose your slides afterwards or do you want to keep them? If you don’t want to dispose them, do you put them on your attic again? Have you heard about “Upcycling”?

Upcycling means that trash or actually useless materials are going to be converted into new products, that is to say you revalue the material.

In 1994 the idea of Upcycling was mentioned the first time but it became more and more popular in the last two or three years. Famous examples are messenger bags or pockets made out of recycled truck canvas or frisbees made out of recycled PET-bottles. In addition more and more big companies produce their products from recycled materials.

The employees of ScanCorner digitise hundreds of slides every day. During that process we are asking ourselves what you are going to do afterwards with them. In this blog post we would like to present you one idea on what you can do with your slides afterwards.

On Pinterest or on the following page you will find examples on how to convert your old slides into an old lamp or a curtain.

slides
© Ann-Sophie

What do you need for this? Patience, instant adhesive, modelling material, a candle/ light bulb and your old slides.

We think that upcycling is another possibility to unveil your old memories in a different way than digitization. Everyone is looking at these small images when they are illuminated. With your construction style, you decide the durability of your lamp. The lamp on the mentioned website will be something for the damp and dark months in autumn or winter but you can make your memories last a lifetime too.

Please put the modelling material in a circle on your window-still and stick the first slides into it. Glue the slides with an instant adhesive or glue together. The next steps are a little trickier because you have to fix the following slides above the existing slides. You repeat this steps until you reach the expected height.

Enjoy your upcycled lamp – your ScanCorner-Team

All about slides and different types of slides

Slides:

Before digital photography was the norm, prints and slides were generally two methods of processing film. Prints were developed on a sheet of photo paper, while slides were small, transparent pieces of film in a cardboard sandwich.

‘Slide’ commonly refers to a 35 mm photographic positive image comprising chromogenic dyes on a transparent base held inside a plastic or card mount intended for projection onto a screen using a slide projector. Without this mount, the transparent film material would not be able to slide from one image to another inside a carousel or magazine when projected.

Kodak Carousel slide projector
Kodak Carousel slide projector

A 35 mm slide can be magnified by a factor of 100 (from 35 mm to 3,500 mm) and still maintain a crisp and detailed projected image. The size of what you see displayed on the screen is based on the distance from the projector. The further away from the screen, the larger the 35mm Slides will display.

Kodak advertisement in LIFE, 5 October 1959 p.68
Kodak advertisement in LIFE, 5 October 1959 p.68

Kodak’s commercial slogan during the 1950s was: ‘For sparkling pictures big as life … Kodak 35mm colour slides’. During the 35 years of their popularity, from 1960s to the mid-1990s, processing costs for slides to create high-quality projected images were relatively low. They were widely used to capture performances, journeys and the lives of artists and used in contexts ranging from domestic to commercial applications such as advertising, arts, fashion and industry. No other medium could compete with the ability of slides to produce large-scale projected images of comparable excellence. Video technology, for example, could only produce a fraction of the quality. Alternative technologies such as 16 mm film involved elaborate production process. The only other format that was readily available on a similar budget, without the need of professional post-production was 8 mm film, produced for the home movie market. Both 16 mm and 8 mm film are moving image media and hence produce a very different quality of image.

Many art historians still refer to slide-based artworks as slide-tape. This term dates from the 1970s when magnetic audio-tapes in cassette format were used to store a tone that cued slide changes alongside the audio track or spoken word accompanying the images.

Information About the different slides in your Slide Collection

The image advertisements many movie theaters show before the movies are usually, projected 35mm slides. Below, you will find some of the different types of slides:

135 Slide (35mm Slide)126 “Instamatic” Slide

35mmSlide

127 Super Slide

127-slide

126 Slide

126-slide

110 Slide

110-slide

old “3D” or “Stereo” slides

3dslide-cardboard

Medium Format, 120  slide

medium-formatLarge Format Slide Transparency

large-format

Airequipt slides

slide_types_10_metal

Glass Slides

slide_types_09b_glass