Historical aerial photos of Minneapolis made available online

University of Minnesota Libraries, City of Minneapolis and the Minnesota Historical Society worked together and completed digitisation of more than 4,500 historical aerial photos of Minneapolis, dating back to 1938.

These scanned photos of the Minneapolis were added to the already existing online collection of the Minnesota Historical Aerial Photographs, of more than 121,000 aerial photographs from around the state dating back to 1923. The original photographs will be preserved by the Libraries and the digital images are freely available for viewing by the public.  Students and history enthusiasts can use these photos as part of their research project to make a study on how the area back in 1938 changed over time.

Ryan Mattke, head of the John R. Borchert Library  said “I think that this project is a great collaboration among the City of Minneapolis, the Minnesota Historical Society, and the University of Minnesota to make sure that these historical resources are not only preserved and archived but also available to the public for use by anybody.”

“Because of our partnership with the Borchert Map Library, we’ve been successful at providing digital images online to give immediate benefits to the community, while ensuring proper long-term care of the original artifacts,” said City Clerk Casey Carl, city of Minneapolis. “This project was a true win-win partnership for the city and the community.”

You can view the aerial photographs here: https://www.lib.umn.edu/apps/mhapo/index.html#mpls

Results of the customer survey in April 2015

In April 2015 we asked our customers to provide feedback for the quality of our services. The purpose of the survey was to find out how our client’s rate our website, the quality of our digitised formats and our customer support.

We summarised the most important results of the survey for you:

Usability of the website

In terms of the website appearance and regarding the question how easy the order process at ScanCorner is, 53% of the customers rated the order process at our website as very easy. Furthermore 46% of our clients rated our website as very helpful to get an overview of the offers and prices of our services.

Quality of the digitised formats

For a more detailed analysis the results regarding the photo digitisation and video digitisation were considered separately.

In terms of photo digitisation, 44% of our customers were deeply contended with the quality of their digitised images, negatives and slides. Another 49% are deeply contented with the colour correction of the pictures.

In the field of video digitisation (VHS, VHS-C, S-VHS, Hi8, Video8, Super8, MiniDV) 50% of the respondents are satisfied with the image quality of their digitised videos. Furthermore 53% of our customers are satisfied with the sound quality of the videos.

Packaging

It is very important for us that the precious memories of our customers arrive safely and without any damages at their homes. This is why we package any analogue formats like slides, negatives, photos, APS and other analogue photographic material very carefully. Regarding the question of whether the received videos or photos were sufficient and carefully packed, 70% of respondents answered that they are deeply contented with the packaging.

Customer Care

According to the motto “The consumer is the boss” it is important for us to analyse how our customers evaluate our support. The results help us to find solutions how to communicate with our clients more effectively and optimise our services.

The proportion of respondents, who rate the customer service as very friendly is 62%. For good customer service, it is particularly important to answer customer inquiries in a timely manner. Regarding the questions of whether the customers received a quick response to their requests, 58% answered that they were deeply contented with the quick responses of the customer support. 

All in all, more than half of our customers was satisfied with our service. Overall, 66% of our clients would digitise their precious memories again at ScanCorner and 60% of the respondents would recommend ScanCorner to their friends and acquaintances.

ScanCorner thanks you for participating in the survey. We look forward to more orders from you, your friends and acquaintances.

Regards

Your ScanCorner Team

Grandma finds photo of herself taken 70 years ago in newly released Nanjing Archives

Xu, an 84 year old grandma found a picture of herself as a teenager for the first time among the household registration cards that was made available to the public by the Nanjing Archives in the capital city of east China’s province. The organisation has invited local residents to look through the household registration cards of the Republic of China (1912-1949) on May 26.

The archive has completed the digitisation process of the sorted and categorised household registration cards. The archive has added 1.5 million cards to the fourth list of China’s archival document heritage, to help local residents to trace the life of their family history.

Xu, who came to look for her father’s file, found the household cards of all her family’s members, including herself aged 15, all registered in 1947. On her card, the photo featured a vigorous face and a pair of bright eyes. She was still registered as a high school student under her original family name “Lu.” She was later renamed Xu by her relative, who took care of her later.

“I didn’t expect to see this photo. Actually, my family never had such a photo,” said Xu with smile.

Xu Zhang, 84, shows her teen photo on her family's household registration card [Yangtze Evening Post/Zhang Ke]
Xu Zhang, 84, shows her teen photo on her family’s household registration card [Yangtze Evening Post/Zhang Ke]
The Nanjing Archives stated that these household registration cards are of great value to researchers, as they provide reference to study Nanjing’s historic changes, records of Nanjing’s then population, residents’ occupations, educational backgrounds as well as personal photos and also allowing residents to search for their missing relatives.