Historical aerial photos of Minneapolis made available online

University of Minnesota Libraries, City of Minneapolis and the Minnesota Historical Society worked together and completed digitisation of more than 4,500 historical aerial photos of Minneapolis, dating back to 1938.

These scanned photos of the Minneapolis were added to the already existing online collection of the Minnesota Historical Aerial Photographs, of more than 121,000 aerial photographs from around the state dating back to 1923. The original photographs will be preserved by the Libraries and the digital images are freely available for viewing by the public.  Students and history enthusiasts can use these photos as part of their research project to make a study on how the area back in 1938 changed over time.

Ryan Mattke, head of the John R. Borchert Library  said “I think that this project is a great collaboration among the City of Minneapolis, the Minnesota Historical Society, and the University of Minnesota to make sure that these historical resources are not only preserved and archived but also available to the public for use by anybody.”

“Because of our partnership with the Borchert Map Library, we’ve been successful at providing digital images online to give immediate benefits to the community, while ensuring proper long-term care of the original artifacts,” said City Clerk Casey Carl, city of Minneapolis. “This project was a true win-win partnership for the city and the community.”

You can view the aerial photographs here: https://www.lib.umn.edu/apps/mhapo/index.html#mpls

Rare photos from the Korean Wars published

The rare photos of the Korean War which broke out on June 25, 1950, were published by the Yonhap News Agency, to mark the 65th anniversary of the war. The photographs taken by the International Committee of the Red Cross provide insight into the tragedy during the Korean War which lasted from 1950 till 1953.

In Korea, this war is  known as the “6-2-5 (yug ee oh) War,” a reference to June 25, 1950, when the North Korean People’s Army invaded the South. Among North Koreans, it’s “the Fatherland Liberation War” and the Americans called it as “The Forgotten War”.

An F-80 "Shooting Star" banks sharply as it lines up a June, 1951 target. Photo, U.S. National Archives. Photo, U.S. National Archives. Photo, U.S. National Archives. Photo, U.S. National Archives.
An F-80 “Shooting Star” banks sharply as it lines up a June, 1951 target. Photo: U.S. National Archives

The war was fought by the United States and 20 other allied countries on the side of South Korea, marking the first major armed conflict in the Cold War era pitting Communists against non-Communists internationally. During the three-year conflict, about 140,000 South Korean troops were killed and some 450,000 were injured, some 215,000 North Korean soldiers killed with some 300,000 wounded and approximately 2.5 million civilians killed on the Korean Peninsula.

The brutal war lasted for approximately three years and ended when the United Nations Command, the North Korean People’s Army and the Chinese People’s Volunteers signed an armistice agreement and not a peace treaty, leaving South and North Korea at war for the past 65 years.

 Korean-War photo - taken on the 21st of September. Photo, U.S. National Archives.
Korean-War photo – taken on the 21st of September. Photo: U.S. National Archives

Grandma finds photo of herself taken 70 years ago in newly released Nanjing Archives

Xu, an 84 year old grandma found a picture of herself as a teenager for the first time among the household registration cards that was made available to the public by the Nanjing Archives in the capital city of east China’s province. The organisation has invited local residents to look through the household registration cards of the Republic of China (1912-1949) on May 26.

The archive has completed the digitisation process of the sorted and categorised household registration cards. The archive has added 1.5 million cards to the fourth list of China’s archival document heritage, to help local residents to trace the life of their family history.

Xu, who came to look for her father’s file, found the household cards of all her family’s members, including herself aged 15, all registered in 1947. On her card, the photo featured a vigorous face and a pair of bright eyes. She was still registered as a high school student under her original family name “Lu.” She was later renamed Xu by her relative, who took care of her later.

“I didn’t expect to see this photo. Actually, my family never had such a photo,” said Xu with smile.

Xu Zhang, 84, shows her teen photo on her family's household registration card [Yangtze Evening Post/Zhang Ke]
Xu Zhang, 84, shows her teen photo on her family’s household registration card [Yangtze Evening Post/Zhang Ke]
The Nanjing Archives stated that these household registration cards are of great value to researchers, as they provide reference to study Nanjing’s historic changes, records of Nanjing’s then population, residents’ occupations, educational backgrounds as well as personal photos and also allowing residents to search for their missing relatives.