ScanCorner: Digitise analogue video and photo formats

Analogue photo formats do not last forever. UV radiation, humidity and mold can damage valuable personal treasures like a photo. In order to protect such memories against long-term natural decay, it is important to restore and digitalise those analogue old formats. ScanCorner helps you with preserving all of life’s special moments in digital form. We digitise negatives, slides, old photographs, VHS tapes and Super 8 mm films. We serve Switzerland, United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Australia and India.

Place an order online

It all starts with the customer placing an order online giving the order details and shipping address. Once the order is placed online, a confirmation email is generated which has to be printed out and sent along with the order to us. Once we receive it, we weigh the order and make the estimate of the order size.  And don’t forget to quote your voucher code to receive your special discount.

Manual Scanning and Restoration

Our professionals clean and scan all the images manually on high-end scanners. They check for scratches and colour correction, edit and enhance them by special procedure, providing you with the best quality. The video digitisation involves optimization of image and sound quality, brightness and colour correction and digital noise reduction.

Personalised online gallery and DVD

After the restoration process, a link to your personal online gallery is sent to you, with low resolution photos of the processed negatives, slides and photo prints, for you to review.  For videos, a short 3 minute preview is uploaded to the online gallery, again with link being sent to you. If there are any concerns with the quality of the digitisation, please let us know and ScanCorner implements the correction requests.  You are then provided with your personalised DVD along with all the originals which are shipped back to you. This personalised DVD is easy to preserve, access and share.

Finally a download link to the digitised photo or video formats is available on request.

Memories last for a lifetime?

On our website and on our flyers we claim that we save your memories for a lifetime. We recommend and advice you to digitise your old slides or photos to save them before they get stained and your memories get lost forever. Some of you take the chance of our offer to get them scanned to DVD and save them forever.

Onseveral trade fairs you ask us many times the same question, not only there but our customer support gets many queries with the same topic, too: What is the durability of the provided DVDs and how reliable are these DVD as storage for my memories?

Unfortunately we can’t provide you with an exact and guaranteed answer about that topic with that blog post. We have to rely and trust the details of the producer, too. Some of them claim a life span of almost 100 years for their DVD’s, others – independent researches – mention a lifespan between five to ten years. We think that a life span of 10 years is more realistic, though every one of us has many music CD’s in the shelves which are older than 10 years.

The next question of you might be, if it is sufficient to renew the own DVDs which contain the valuable memories after a specific period?

We recommend you to save your memories from the beginning on a different device, either on a cloud or on your PC to avoid any reading errors or other troubles with your DVD. Nowadays there are many cheap external hard discs available which are useful to save your important data. In addition we recommend you to renew your DVD every two years to have another copy of your important files.

If you are done with these steps to save your valuable data, you can enjoy your images or movies on your PC or tablet and you don’t have to worry about losing your memories for a lifetime.

If you need any further assistance about the right storage device or if you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact our customer support.

About ScanCorner

ScanCorner offers one of the best value digitisation services in UK. Every memory is handled by professionals who scan and restore them to bring out the best quality. We also create a personalised online gallery with the digitised images which you can share with your friends and family.

 

Historical aerial photos of Minneapolis made available online

University of Minnesota Libraries, City of Minneapolis and the Minnesota Historical Society worked together and completed digitisation of more than 4,500 historical aerial photos of Minneapolis, dating back to 1938.

These scanned photos of the Minneapolis were added to the already existing online collection of the Minnesota Historical Aerial Photographs, of more than 121,000 aerial photographs from around the state dating back to 1923. The original photographs will be preserved by the Libraries and the digital images are freely available for viewing by the public.  Students and history enthusiasts can use these photos as part of their research project to make a study on how the area back in 1938 changed over time.

Ryan Mattke, head of the John R. Borchert Library  said “I think that this project is a great collaboration among the City of Minneapolis, the Minnesota Historical Society, and the University of Minnesota to make sure that these historical resources are not only preserved and archived but also available to the public for use by anybody.”

“Because of our partnership with the Borchert Map Library, we’ve been successful at providing digital images online to give immediate benefits to the community, while ensuring proper long-term care of the original artifacts,” said City Clerk Casey Carl, city of Minneapolis. “This project was a true win-win partnership for the city and the community.”

You can view the aerial photographs here: https://www.lib.umn.edu/apps/mhapo/index.html#mpls

Results of the customer survey in April 2015

In April 2015 we asked our customers to provide feedback for the quality of our services. The purpose of the survey was to find out how our client’s rate our website, the quality of our digitised formats and our customer support.

We summarised the most important results of the survey for you:

Usability of the website

In terms of the website appearance and regarding the question how easy the order process at ScanCorner is, 53% of the customers rated the order process at our website as very easy. Furthermore 46% of our clients rated our website as very helpful to get an overview of the offers and prices of our services.

Quality of the digitised formats

For a more detailed analysis the results regarding the photo digitisation and video digitisation were considered separately.

In terms of photo digitisation, 44% of our customers were deeply contended with the quality of their digitised images, negatives and slides. Another 49% are deeply contented with the colour correction of the pictures.

In the field of video digitisation (VHS, VHS-C, S-VHS, Hi8, Video8, Super8, MiniDV) 50% of the respondents are satisfied with the image quality of their digitised videos. Furthermore 53% of our customers are satisfied with the sound quality of the videos.

Packaging

It is very important for us that the precious memories of our customers arrive safely and without any damages at their homes. This is why we package any analogue formats like slides, negatives, photos, APS and other analogue photographic material very carefully. Regarding the question of whether the received videos or photos were sufficient and carefully packed, 70% of respondents answered that they are deeply contented with the packaging.

Customer Care

According to the motto “The consumer is the boss” it is important for us to analyse how our customers evaluate our support. The results help us to find solutions how to communicate with our clients more effectively and optimise our services.

The proportion of respondents, who rate the customer service as very friendly is 62%. For good customer service, it is particularly important to answer customer inquiries in a timely manner. Regarding the questions of whether the customers received a quick response to their requests, 58% answered that they were deeply contented with the quick responses of the customer support. 

All in all, more than half of our customers was satisfied with our service. Overall, 66% of our clients would digitise their precious memories again at ScanCorner and 60% of the respondents would recommend ScanCorner to their friends and acquaintances.

ScanCorner thanks you for participating in the survey. We look forward to more orders from you, your friends and acquaintances.

Regards

Your ScanCorner Team

Grandma finds photo of herself taken 70 years ago in newly released Nanjing Archives

Xu, an 84 year old grandma found a picture of herself as a teenager for the first time among the household registration cards that was made available to the public by the Nanjing Archives in the capital city of east China’s province. The organisation has invited local residents to look through the household registration cards of the Republic of China (1912-1949) on May 26.

The archive has completed the digitisation process of the sorted and categorised household registration cards. The archive has added 1.5 million cards to the fourth list of China’s archival document heritage, to help local residents to trace the life of their family history.

Xu, who came to look for her father’s file, found the household cards of all her family’s members, including herself aged 15, all registered in 1947. On her card, the photo featured a vigorous face and a pair of bright eyes. She was still registered as a high school student under her original family name “Lu.” She was later renamed Xu by her relative, who took care of her later.

“I didn’t expect to see this photo. Actually, my family never had such a photo,” said Xu with smile.

Xu Zhang, 84, shows her teen photo on her family's household registration card [Yangtze Evening Post/Zhang Ke]
Xu Zhang, 84, shows her teen photo on her family’s household registration card [Yangtze Evening Post/Zhang Ke]
The Nanjing Archives stated that these household registration cards are of great value to researchers, as they provide reference to study Nanjing’s historic changes, records of Nanjing’s then population, residents’ occupations, educational backgrounds as well as personal photos and also allowing residents to search for their missing relatives.

All about slides and different types of slides

Slides:

Before digital photography was the norm, prints and slides were generally two methods of processing film. Prints were developed on a sheet of photo paper, while slides were small, transparent pieces of film in a cardboard sandwich.

‘Slide’ commonly refers to a 35 mm photographic positive image comprising chromogenic dyes on a transparent base held inside a plastic or card mount intended for projection onto a screen using a slide projector. Without this mount, the transparent film material would not be able to slide from one image to another inside a carousel or magazine when projected.

Kodak Carousel slide projector
Kodak Carousel slide projector

A 35 mm slide can be magnified by a factor of 100 (from 35 mm to 3,500 mm) and still maintain a crisp and detailed projected image. The size of what you see displayed on the screen is based on the distance from the projector. The further away from the screen, the larger the 35mm Slides will display.

Kodak advertisement in LIFE, 5 October 1959 p.68
Kodak advertisement in LIFE, 5 October 1959 p.68

Kodak’s commercial slogan during the 1950s was: ‘For sparkling pictures big as life … Kodak 35mm colour slides’. During the 35 years of their popularity, from 1960s to the mid-1990s, processing costs for slides to create high-quality projected images were relatively low. They were widely used to capture performances, journeys and the lives of artists and used in contexts ranging from domestic to commercial applications such as advertising, arts, fashion and industry. No other medium could compete with the ability of slides to produce large-scale projected images of comparable excellence. Video technology, for example, could only produce a fraction of the quality. Alternative technologies such as 16 mm film involved elaborate production process. The only other format that was readily available on a similar budget, without the need of professional post-production was 8 mm film, produced for the home movie market. Both 16 mm and 8 mm film are moving image media and hence produce a very different quality of image.

Many art historians still refer to slide-based artworks as slide-tape. This term dates from the 1970s when magnetic audio-tapes in cassette format were used to store a tone that cued slide changes alongside the audio track or spoken word accompanying the images.

Information About the different slides in your Slide Collection

The image advertisements many movie theaters show before the movies are usually, projected 35mm slides. Below, you will find some of the different types of slides:

135 Slide (35mm Slide)126 “Instamatic” Slide

35mmSlide

127 Super Slide

127-slide

126 Slide

126-slide

110 Slide

110-slide

old “3D” or “Stereo” slides

3dslide-cardboard

Medium Format, 120  slide

medium-formatLarge Format Slide Transparency

large-format

Airequipt slides

slide_types_10_metal

Glass Slides

slide_types_09b_glass

150 years old Mark Twain stories uncovered by the scholars

Twain’s articles, about 150 years old, written when the author was a young newsman in San Francisco,have been tracked down by the Scholars at the University of California, Berkeley.

Author Mark Twain(via AP)
Author Mark Twain(via AP)

Twain’s job was to write a 2,000-word story or letter every day for publication in the Territorial Enterprise newspaper in Virginia City, Nevada, six days a week for a salary of $100 a month. He wrote about everything from San Francisco police to mining accidents. The scholars picked through archives of other western U.S. newspapers for copies. They have found about 110 columns written in 1865 and 1866.

“This is new stuff, even for Mark Twain fans,” Hirst told the Chronicle. Bob Hirst is editor of the UC Berkeley’s Mark Twain project and says the articles were found when looking through western newspaper archives.

In one letter, Twain suggested tough punishment for corrupt police officers in San Francisco, saying they were less useful than “wax figurines,” as reported by the Chronicle.

Hirst said that the articles were written at a time of when Twain was trying to decide in which direction to take his career. “It’s really a crisis time for him,” Hirst said. “He’s going to be 30 on 30 November 1865, and for someone not to have chosen a career by that time in this period was quite unusual.” He was in debt and drinking heavily, and even wrote to his brother that he was committing suicide, saying: “If I do not get out of debt in three months – pistols or poison for one – exit me.”

The articles are the perfect example of Twain’s matchless style.

Bob Hirst, the general editor of the Mark Twain Project, with a book of 1866 Sacramento Union newspapers at the Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley. (Jeff Chiu/AP)
Bob Hirst, the general editor of the Mark Twain Project, with a book of 1866 Sacramento Union newspapers at the Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley. (Jeff Chiu/AP)

The first ever scanned Image

The very first digital photograph was a picture of Russel A. Kirch’s three month old son, Walden. This turned out to be the basis for the satellite imaging, CAT scans, bar codes on packaging, desktop publishing, digital photography and other revolutionary developments in image processing technology.

Rusell A. Kirsch was part of the team of National Bureau of standards (NBS) which developed the Standard’s Eastern Automatic Computer (SEAC), U. S.’s first programmable computer, in 1950. This group created a rotating drum scanner which was used for the digital scans in 1957. The first digital scan was of a 5cm x 5cm square photograph of Russell’s son, Walden. It was a black and white picture captured as just 30,976 pixels, a 176 x 176 array. The original picture is in the Portland Art Museum.

In 2003, Life Magazine named the scanned picture of Kirsch’s son as one of “the 100 photographs that changed the world”.

kirsch's son, Walden
kirsch’s son, Walden

Image: NIST Image Gallery